WONDERFUL CEREMONIES WITH SHANNON THUNDERBIRD.

GYEMK ~LOOP AND K'OOL GYET NAH HOOL WOMEN'S BIG DRUMS

 

From the Tsimshian to the Lakota, ceremonies shake the soul awake to allow for the purification of the seven realms of existence: physical (East), Spiritual (South), Emotional (West), Mind (North), Life Above the Earth, Life Below the Earth, Life Within Each of us. Ceremonies open the spirit to embrace a big, positive life open to new ways of thinking and new possibilities. The smoke from the sacred fire carries our prayers to the Ancestors.

 

Ceremonies are the cultural foundation of physical, spiritual, emotional and mindful life. They are anchored in prayers, stories, songs, dance and drums. We sang before we spoke, and ideas were born from the music;  songs brought our Ancestors to share in the rituals. Our ceremonies celebrated everything from a change in season, to a girl's first moon time, to a young man coming of age, to the full moon, to giving thanks for all that in form and gratefulness to Mother Earth as she sustains us in our earth walks.

 

The sacred fire burns during ceremonies carrying our prayers to our Ancestors, to Father Sky. Out of the ashes of the sacred fire comes new ways of being, living, behaving.  Rebirth of the soul is front and centre to living a centred life.

 

 Ceremonies, require discipline, strength of purpose and a clear understanding of why it is necessary to participate in the first place. Indigenous rituals come with a caveat, "be careful what you ask for." Powers greater than you can sometimes be literally-minded, so questions, prayers, requests need to be clearly thought out before being articulated and the appropriate respect given to the answers, even if they weren't the ones you thought you asked for! 

 

 

 

FALL EQUINOX CELEBRATION,
SEPTEMBER, 2014

The Equinoxes are that in-between time anchored by the Summer and Winter Solstices. The scientific explanation is that an equinox occurs when the plane of Earth's Equator passes the center of the Sun. At that instant, the tilt of Earth's axis neither inclines away from nor towards the Sun. In other words, it is a time of reflection as we honour equal lengths of daylight and night-time -- 12 hours of day, 12 hours of night.

It is also the time when harvests are winding down. The fields are nearly empty, because the crops have been plucked and stored for the coming winter. It is a time of giving thanks for the things we have, whether it be abundant food, good health, family, friends, country, whatever it is you feel blessed about. While we celebrate the gifts of the earth, we also accept that the soil is getting ready for its deep sleep. Cover your altar with cloths that symbolize the harvest season, or go a step further and put brightly colored fallen leaves upon your work surface. Use candles in deep, rich colors -- reds, golds, or other autumn shades are perfect this time of year.

 

We celebrated with the pipe ceremony, and a talking circle. We ate food of the season, we drummed on the big drums, our songs echoed through the neighbourhood bringing people out of their houses to join in. It was a glorious, sunny day and we were in tune with each other and Noo Halidzoks (Mother Earth).

 

 

SHANNON THUNDERBIRD'S SIXTEENTH ANNUAL WOMEN'S WINTER SOLTICE CEREMONY/CELEBRATION

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2014

The Winter is "Women's Time", having spent the spring and summer preparing for the long winter months. Tribal communities were always working a season ahead. It was in this time that women told stories, created songs, offered teachings, all around the warmth of fire.  They sang and drummed on their female relatives the big drums and hand drums to remember language, teach children, heal hearts, honour nature, communities, notwithstanding women and men. Men respected and honoured women in their role as keepers of the stories as told, in part through the drums....and the tribes hummed for thousands and thousands of years.

 



 

PIPE CEREMONY

 A sacred ritual for connecting physical and spiritual worlds, a link between the earth and the sky. The pipe is our prayers in physical form. Smoke becomes our words; it goes out, touches everything, and becomes a part of all there is. The fire in the pipe is the same fire in the sun, which is the source of life. The reason why tobacco is used to connect the worlds is that the plant's roots go deep into the earth, and its smoke rises high into the heavens.

PIPE SONG

Wah heena Wah, Wah heena Wah, Wah Heena wah

Wah heena Wah, Wah heena Wah, Wah Heena wah

 

~Looda ~Lagyigyeda diduuls tguye~lk

Wah heena Wah, Wah heena Wah,

Wah heena Wah

Sip'iyaansk asda Kanonou  ~Lagyigyeda

Wah heena Wah, Wah Heena Wah, Wa Wah Heena wah

Generally Sacred Pipes consist of two parts, a tobacco-holding bowl (female) made of bone, wood, stone, or metal (as in calumet pipes or some of the later trading pipes) and a stem (male), usually made of wood. They remain separate until the start of the ceremony.

 

The pipe, when bowl and stem are joined, is a living being with energies coursing up and down its spine. The pipe is a ritual object created to focus and alter the consciousness of the user. It has its reflection in the human body and in the Universe. The pipe is a cosmos unto itself uniting all dualities within Creation.

NOTE: Although the pipe represents one of the highest forms of Native spirituality, you do not have to be a pipe carrier to receive the messages from the universe or to live a sacred life.

 

CLICK PIPE CARRIER FOR MORE ON THE SACRED PIPE

 




 






 




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